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OLD_New York Stories of Fascinating Issues

Without Words: A Poet’s Struggle With Alzheimer’s by Almudena Toral

Jack Agüeros, a New York poet with Alzheimer’s disease, has lost the ability to read and write but still has moments of lucidity. Published on NYTimes.com on June 30, 2011.

Dreams Dashed: A New York Immigrant’s Story by Megan Izen

Most college students don’t know exactly what they’ll do after graduation. But for some students, even a bachelor’s degree doesn’t mean they’ll be able to work. Undocumented students like Lehman College freshman Marlen Fernandez pursue higher education hoping their circumstances will change.

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Throw like a girl: Professional women’s football player Karen Mulligan by Matt Draper

Karen Mulligan, a physical education teacher and former college basketball player, now gets her athletic kicks as quarterback for the New York Sharks of the Women’s Professional Football League. Nine years after donning her first set of shoulder pads, Mulligan is one of the league’s standout players who continues to shatter the stereotypes of how a quarterback — and football player – looks and plays.

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The Pitch by Lauren Friedman

Eric Coull, who has cerebral palsy, has been cheering for the Mets since he was 10. Now he has the chance to step out onto the diamond and become part of the action he has always watched from afar.

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Chinatown’s Counterfeit Handbag Trade: An undercover look at the illegal trade of handbags and Council Member Margaret Chin’s plans to crush it by Al Barbarino

NYC Council Member Margaret Chin’s new bill is an attempt to clamp down on the illegal counterfeit handbag trade. Watch the video below for an undercover look at the scope of the problem as viewed from the streets of Chinatown

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An Opportunity For a New Life, Marred by Loss by Jose Bayona


The Innis’ family story, as well as the stories of other Caribbean teachers, is the story of a broken promise and its consequences in the life of many international teachers recruited by the NYC Department of Education a decade ago.

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A Recycled LIfe by Léa Baron

Recycling bottles and cans are not only an environmental concern. For some people, it’s a way to survive, their unique income. Randy Braswell,50, has been collecting bottles for seven months. Before ending up with this job, he was a truck driver and deliveryman. But his life broke down.

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How Fragile We Are: Jacobi Hospitals Emergency Room by Paul Bufano

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Gasping for Air: Living with Asthma in Hunts Point by Ashley Welch

Yvette Bonilla lives in Hunts Point with her daughter and three grandchildren. All three generations suffer from asthma. Tens of thousands of trucks rumble through Hunts Point daily on their way to waste transfer stations where 40 percent of New York City’s commercial waste is dumped. Over the years, the poor air quality created an unhealthy atmosphere for Hunts Point residents, where one in four children suffer from asthma.

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Manorexia- When eating hurts. by Sherrina Navani

Eating disorders don’t just affect women, a growing number of men are now starting to “come out” of the eating disorder closet. Vic Avon shares his near death experience and talks about his battle with Anorexia, more commonly known in men as Manorexia.

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Made in Brooklyn: Cacao Prieto Chocolate by Alva French

Cacao Prieto, is probably Red Hook’s best kept secret. The chocolate factory in the heart of industrial Brooklyn, has quietly been making chocolate bonbons for private parties and to the public in its pop-up shop in DUMBO. Although, the pop-up shop closed at the end of the Spring season, the Red Hook factory is poised to open it’s doors to the public this summer.

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